Americans say keep politics out of the Fed

The United States Federal Reserve Board building is shown behind security barriers in WashingtonBy Michael Flaherty WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Most Americans don't know who runs the Federal Reserve, but they do believe that elected officials should stay out of its business, according to a Reuters-Ipsos poll.     Just 24 percent of those polled said Congress should be allowed to have detailed oversight of the Fed, the poll shows. More than double that amount said the central bank should be left alone.     The poll of 1,388 Americans was conducted from Feb 20-24 to measure whether people supported proposed legislation that would expose the Fed to a full government audit, a move being led by Rand Paul, a likely 2016 presidential candidate.     The Republican Senator from Kentucky held an "Audit the Fed" rally in Iowa last month, and his spokesman told Reuters that polls showed Americans want the central bank to be audited.     Supporters of the campaign say the Fed needs more transparency and accountability.


Video shows Los Angeles police shooting homeless man dead

(Reuters) - A video posted online shows Los Angeles police scuffling with and shooting a homeless man during a confrontation, The Los Angeles Times reported on its web site. The video, posted on Facebook, shows several uniformed Los Angeles Police Department officers scuffling with a man in a downtown area where homeless people pitch tents at night known as skid row. A series of civilian deaths at the hands of police in the past year has become a touchstone for trouble race relations in the United States, most notably in Ferguson, Missouri, when an unarmed teen-ager was shot and killed by a police officer, triggering weeks of protests and some rioting. The homeless man in the video was declared dead at a hospital shortly after the shooting, the Times reported, citing police spokesman Sgt. Barry Montgomery.

Still more snow and ice snarling airline traffic for Northeast

A man stands in falling snow at the shore of the Hudson River in the New York City suburban town of Nyack, New YorkAlthough less intense than the harshest winter storms of the past month, snow fell from the nation's capital to New England, with southern sections of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts hardest hit, according to the National Weather Service. A winter storm warning was posted for those areas. Three to six inches of snow was expected to accumulate around Cape Cod and along the south coast of Massachusetts, with up to 8 inches in some spots, before tapering off or changing to freezing rain early on Monday, said meteorologist Frank Nocera of the Boston-area Weather Service office.


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